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Bloom's Taxonomy Debunked

Every teacher and their mother has heard about Bloom's taxonomy, which we use when writing lesson plans to create measurable learning outcomes. Bloom's Taxonomy is a framework for categorizing educational learning objectives.


It was developed in the 1950s by Benjamin Bloom, an educational psychologist, and revised in 2001 by his colleague and student to serve as one of the most successful ways to think of learning outcomes.


Bloom's Taxonomy is considered good for several reasons. One of the main reasons is that it provides a clear and structured framework for thinking about the learning outcomes. This can help us educators design lessons and assessments that are more effective and better aligned with our teaching goals and the curriculum.


Also, the framework is widely recognized and used, so it provides a common language and set of standards that can be used by teachers across different institutions and settings.


Finally, the six levels of the taxonomy provide a hierarchical structure that can be used to organize and sequence learning activities in a way that helps students to build upon their prior knowledge and gradually acquire more complex skills and understanding.


The framework is often represented as a pyramid with six levels of increasing complexity:

  1. Remembering: This level involves recalling previously learned information.

  2. Understanding: This level involves comprehending the meaning of the information.

  3. Applying: This level involves using the information in a new situation.

  4. Analyzing: This level involves breaking down the information into its parts and understanding the relationships among them.

  5. Evaluating: This level involves making judgments about the value or quality of the information.

  6. Creating: This level involves using the information to create something new.

Each level can be represented by various "action" verbs to set clear goals for each lesson and have an overview of the level of knowledge your students will acquire during that lesson. The goal should be to get your students to level 6 to really apply the knowledge acquired.


Below you can find a visual representation of the verbs that you can use when writing lesson plans:


Bloom's taxonomy pyramid
Image source: https://www.valamis.com/hub/blooms-taxonomy

Here are a few examples of great learning outcomes using Bloom's taxonomy sorted by levels:

  1. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to list the most important works of art in the Impressionist movement.

  2. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to describe a cell.

  3. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to solve cubic equations.

  4. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to compare the characters of Holden Caulfield and Dorian Gray.

  5. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to appraise the free healthcare system in the EU.

  6. By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to design their own newspaper article on the topic of AI-generated content.

Do you use Bloom's taxonomy in your daily work? How do you find it? Let us know in the comments.

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